Attacks/Breaches

1/28/2019
04:00 PM
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Japan Authorizes IoT Hacking

A new campaign will see government employees hacking into personal IoT devices to identify those at highest security risk.

A new law in Japan allows the nation's National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) to hack into citizens' personal IoT equipment as part of a survey of vulnerable devices. The survey is part of an effort to strengthen Japan's network of Internet of Things devices ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic games.

The survey will begin in February with a trial run of 200 million Web cams and modems. NICT employees will attempt to log into the devices using default account names and passwords, and when they find a vulnerable device, they will alert the ISP and local authorities so the device owner can be contacted and given security recommendations.

While authorities have logged into IoT devices found to have been recruited into botnets and involved in offensive activities, this is the first time a national government has authorized such tactics in a prophylactic effort.

For more, read here.

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ChristopherJames
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ChristopherJames,
User Rank: Strategist
2/13/2019 | 2:32:11 AM
Put the people to work!
This is an interesting way to test out the system for vulnerabilities. Seems like very heavy use of manpower but I reckon that if they can provide a little bit of incentive to the public to help them out with this, the Japanese might just be able to achieve a very robust system in the end.
Ritu_G
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Ritu_G,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/10/2019 | 11:28:27 PM
Hit them to fix them
Sometimes the easiest way to learn is from a mistake. Hence, you wouldn't know exactly how vulnerable your security truly is until you have been hit. This is a strong invasion method but if it works, it should indeed be approved to further strengthen the entire sector of security for both individuals and corporations alike.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/31/2019 | 6:38:56 PM
Re: Head of IT in Japan Govt
@REISEN: Yes, I remember that -- and commented at the time that, admittedly, it may be the best cybersecurity posture of all.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2019 | 3:09:54 PM
Re: Good
Changing default passwords of almost any device has been an IT phrase for years.  Includes connected printers and anything chatting away with a cable and IP packets.  And default passwords are often hidden and hard to find for some users.  
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2019 | 11:17:50 AM
Re: Head of IT in Japan Govt
If memory serves, there was an article some time back that the head of IT security in the government had never used a computer before in his life. That is not a good indicator not lost of CTO/CIO did not really work in the field either.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2019 | 11:16:36 AM
Good
A new campaign will see government employees hacking into personal IoT devices to identify those at highest security risk. Interesting approach and I like it. Default username passwords should be avoided by the manufacturers obviously.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2019 | 9:23:39 AM
Head of IT in Japan Govt
If memory serves, there was an article some time back that the head of IT security in the government had never used a computer before in his life. 
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