Attacks/Breaches

2/8/2019
01:45 PM
50%
50%

Malware Campaign Hides Ransomware in Super Mario Wrapper

A newly discovered malware campaign uses steganography to hide GandCrab in a seemingly innocent Mario image.

In the Mario Brothers universe, Mario is a hero, but that "good guy" status doesn't extend to the real world — at least not for victims of a malware campaign that wraps the GandCrab ransomware in a Mario graphic package.

Matthew Rowan, a researcher at Bromium, discovered the campaign in a malware sample he was analyzing. In his blog post detailing the discovery, he shows how threat actors hide their true intentions, why it's a very bad idea to disable software protection mechanisms, and why old encryption techniques like steganography are still useful in the modern era.

The steganography comes into play with heavily obfuscated Microsoft PowerShell commands hidden within the color channels of a picture of Mario in a particularly cool pose. Rowan notes that hiding commands in the image makes it very difficult for a firewall to pick up the threat and apply a standard filter against the malware.

The new campaign is a threat to computer users in Italy, though, like most such campaigns, it could easily be modified by a different criminal to target users in any (or every) geography. 

Read more here.

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
t_madison
50%
50%
t_madison,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/18/2019 | 3:24:54 AM
Hmmm
This is an interesting point of view.
martasanz
50%
50%
martasanz,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/15/2019 | 5:48:10 AM
Re: Pipes
I totally agree with your answer Reisen! Hahaha
MelvinGray
50%
50%
MelvinGray,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/13/2019 | 10:58:42 AM
Re: Pipes
Right
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
2/11/2019 | 8:43:35 AM
Pipes
Always knew those green pipes leading to an underworld environment were dangerous as were those damn big bullets. 
mexico7708
100%
0%
mexico7708,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/11/2019 | 3:29:37 AM
Malware Only The Tip Of the Iceburg
Malware attackers are becoming more sophisticated and so are threats, which is why technology can sometimes be a double-edged sword according to Tony Granims, Cyber Security Strategist for Critical Strategies Group. William (Tony) Granims was working on many high-level black projects. Granims one of the nations best contract hackers and the NSA was sweeping up an unprecedented amount of information but, because of its secret origins -- was mostly unable to share with the CIA or FBI.
Russia Hacked Clinton's Computers Five Hours After Trump's Call
Robert Lemos, Technology Journalist/Data Researcher,  4/19/2019
Tips for the Aftermath of a Cyberattack
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  4/17/2019
Why We Need a 'Cleaner Internet'
Darren Anstee, Chief Technology Officer at Arbor Networks,  4/19/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
5 Emerging Cyber Threats to Watch for in 2019
Online attackers are constantly developing new, innovative ways to break into the enterprise. This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at five emerging attack trends and exploits your security team should look out for, along with helpful recommendations on how you can prevent your organization from falling victim.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-7303
PUBLISHED: 2019-04-23
A vulnerability in the seccomp filters of Canonical snapd before version 2.37.4 allows a strict mode snap to insert characters into a terminal on a 64-bit host. The seccomp rules were generated to match 64-bit ioctl(2) commands on a 64-bit platform; however, the Linux kernel only uses the lower 32 b...
CVE-2019-7304
PUBLISHED: 2019-04-23
Canonical snapd before version 2.37.1 incorrectly performed socket owner validation, allowing an attacker to run arbitrary commands as root. This issue affects: Canonical snapd versions prior to 2.37.1.
CVE-2019-0223
PUBLISHED: 2019-04-23
While investigating bug PROTON-2014, we discovered that under some circumstances Apache Qpid Proton versions 0.9 to 0.27.0 (C library and its language bindings) can connect to a peer anonymously using TLS *even when configured to verify the peer certificate* while used with OpenSSL versions before 1...
CVE-2017-12619
PUBLISHED: 2019-04-23
Apache Zeppelin prior to 0.7.3 was vulnerable to session fixation which allowed an attacker to hijack a valid user session. Issue was reported by "stone lone".
CVE-2018-1317
PUBLISHED: 2019-04-23
In Apache Zeppelin prior to 0.8.0 the cron scheduler was enabled by default and could allow users to run paragraphs as other users without authentication.