Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Application Security

1/8/2020
03:25 PM
100%
0%

Google's Project Zero Policy Change Mandates 90-Day Disclosure

The updated disclosure policy aims to achieve more thorough and improved patch development, Google reports.

Google's Project Zero, a division focused on security research, today announced changes to its Disclosure Policy. All vulnerabilities will be released after 90 days by default regardless of when a bug is fixed, unless an agreement has been made between Project Zero and the vendor.

The 90-day disclosure deadline has existed for five years and accelerated patch development. When Project Zero began in 2014, some vulnerabilities took longer than six months to address. Last year, 97.7% of issues were addressed under the 90-day deadline. Still, the division recognizes there is progress to be made in patch development and vulnerability management.

Now it is trialing a new policy for bugs reported starting January 1, 2020. Project Zero's old guidelines allowed vulnerability details to be released when the bug was fixed, even if it was ahead of Day 90. Its new policy eliminates early disclosure: details will be released on Day 90 for all bugs. If there is mutual agreement between the vendor and Project Zero, bug reports can be released to the public under the 90-day timeline, researchers report in a blog post.

The goal is to provide a more consistent, and fair way to release patches, wrote Project Zero's Tim Willis in a blog post. While faster patch development remains a goal, the team is now placing equal focus on thorough patch development and broad adoption. It also hopes to create equity among vendors so no one company, including Google, gets preferential treatment.

"Too many times, we've seen vendors patch reported vulnerabilities by 'papering over the cracks' and not considering variants or addressing the root cause of a vulnerability," Willis explained. A focus on "faster patch development" may exacerbate this issue, he continued, enabling attackers to adjust their exploits and continue launching attacks.

Further, Willis pointed out, patches must be applied in order to be effective. "To this end, improving timely patch adoption is important to ensure that users are actually acquiring the benefit from the bug being fixed." With the mandated 90-day window, the hope is that vendors should be able to offer updates and encourage more people to install fixes within 90 days.

Project Zero will test this policy for 12 months then consider whether to make it a long-term change. Read more details in the full blog post here.

Check out The Edge, Dark Reading's new section for features, threat data, and in-depth perspectives. Today's top story: "Car Hacking Hits the Streets"

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
RuskinF
50%
50%
RuskinF,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/9/2020 | 7:28:35 AM
90 days to release the disclosure
Google resolving 97.7% issues within 90 days is a great thing. Now they need to improve their efficiency just by a bit, making the figure 99%. It is challenging but not impossible.
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
6 Emerging Cyber Threats That Enterprises Face in 2020
This Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at six emerging cyber threats that enterprises could face in 2020. Download your copy today!
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-1927
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-02
In Apache HTTP Server 2.4.0 to 2.4.41, redirects configured with mod_rewrite that were intended to be self-referential might be fooled by encoded newlines and redirect instead to an an unexpected URL within the request URL.
CVE-2020-8144
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-01
The UniFi Video Server v3.9.3 and prior (for Windows 7/8/10 x64) web interface Firmware Update functionality, under certain circumstances, does not validate firmware download destinations to ensure they are within the intended destination directory tree. It accepts a request with a URL to firmware u...
CVE-2020-8145
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-01
The UniFi Video Server (Windows) web interface configuration restore functionality at the “backup� and “wizard� endpoints does not implement sufficient privilege checks. Low privileged users, belonging to the PUBLIC_GROUP ...
CVE-2020-8146
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-01
In UniFi Video v3.10.1 (for Windows 7/8/10 x64) there is a Local Privileges Escalation to SYSTEM from arbitrary file deletion and DLL hijack vulnerabilities. The issue was fixed by adjusting the .tsExport folder when the controller is running on Windows and adjusting the SafeDllSearchMode in the win...
CVE-2020-6009
PUBLISHED: 2020-04-01
LearnDash Wordpress plugin version below 3.1.6 is vulnerable to Unauthenticated SQL Injection.