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Attacks/Breaches

Dark Reading to Upgrade Site Design, Performance

Improvements will make site content easier to navigate, faster, and more functional.

Dark Reading will look different to readers in the days ahead, and that's a good thing.

In an effort to improve the reader experience, Dark Reading has embarked on a broad initiative to improve the design, navigation, functionality, and performance of its entire site. In coming months, readers will see new page design, new navigation tools, new links to related content, and new capabilities across the Dark Reading site. We hope that these improvements will make it easier for readers to find the cybersecurity information they need, locate related information, and use Dark Reading's content on mobile devices more effectively.

If you're a loyal reader of Dark Reading, you'll see the same great news, commentary, and in-depth information, but with a new look and feel. Our pages will be better organized, easier to read, and will load faster. You'll see new navigation elements that make it easier to find the stories you're looking for. You'll see new links to Dark Reading's many cybersecurity programs, including webinars, virtual events, original research, white papers, and e-zines. And you'll discover that Dark Reading content is easier to see and read on mobile devices, making it more useful to you when you're at home or on the go.

While we know that these improvements will make your experience much better in the long term, like all home improvement projects, it's likely that there will be a few glitches or hiccups as we implement these new features and capabilities on Dark Reading in the coming months. We want to thank you for your patience as you experience the occasional glitch, and invite you to provide feedback on our new design and features. Some of our new features will offer a pop-up survey, which we hope you'll answer. Or you can write us an email at [email protected].

We are excited about our new design and capabilities, and we hope they make Dark Reading even more helpful and useful to you. Please feel free to offer your feedback! 

Tim Wilson is Editor in Chief and co-founder of Dark Reading.com, UBM Tech's online community for information security professionals. He is responsible for managing the site, assigning and editing content, and writing breaking news stories. Wilson has been recognized as one ... View Full Bio
 

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pedrofortuna
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pedrofortuna,
User Rank: Author
4/23/2021 | 9:11:22 AM
Excellent
This is great news - looking forward to it!
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Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-33033
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-14
The Linux kernel before 5.11.14 has a use-after-free in cipso_v4_genopt in net/ipv4/cipso_ipv4.c because the CIPSO and CALIPSO refcounting for the DOI definitions is mishandled, aka CID-ad5d07f4a9cd. This leads to writing an arbitrary value.
CVE-2021-33034
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-14
In the Linux kernel before 5.12.4, net/bluetooth/hci_event.c has a use-after-free when destroying an hci_chan, aka CID-5c4c8c954409. This leads to writing an arbitrary value.
CVE-2019-25044
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-14
The block subsystem in the Linux kernel before 5.2 has a use-after-free that can lead to arbitrary code execution in the kernel context and privilege escalation, aka CID-c3e2219216c9. This is related to blk_mq_free_rqs and blk_cleanup_queue.
CVE-2020-24119
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-14
A heap buffer overflow read was discovered in upx 4.0.0, because the check in p_lx_elf.cpp is not perfect.
CVE-2020-27833
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-14
A Zip Slip vulnerability was found in the oc binary in openshift-clients where an arbitrary file write is achieved by using a specially crafted raw container image (.tar file) which contains symbolic links. The vulnerability is limited to the command `oc image extract`. If a symbolic link is first c...