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 Curtis Franklin Jr.
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Profile of Curtis Franklin Jr.

Senior Editor at Dark Reading
Member Since: 5/19/2014
Author
News & Commentary Posts: 356
Comments: 313

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Editor at Dark Reading. In this role he focuses on product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he works on audio and video programming for Dark Reading and contributes to activities at Interop ITX, Black Hat, INsecurity, and other conferences.

Previously he was editor of Light Reading's Security Now and executive editor, technology, at InformationWeek where he was also executive producer of InformationWeek's online radio and podcast episodes.

Curtis has been writing about technologies and products in computing and networking since the early 1980s. He has contributed to a number of technology-industry publications including Enterprise Efficiency, ChannelWeb, Network Computing, InfoWorld, PCWorld, Dark Reading, and ITWorld.com on subjects ranging from mobile enterprise computing to enterprise security and wireless networking.

Curtis is the author of thousands of articles, the co-author of five books, and has been a frequent speaker at computer and networking industry conferences across North America and Europe. His most popular book, The Absolute Beginner's Guide to Podcasting, with co-author George Colombo, was published by Que Books. His most recent book, Cloud Computing: Technologies and Strategies of the Ubiquitous Data Center, with co-author Brian Chee, was released in April 2010. His next book, Securing the Cloud: Security Strategies for the Ubiquitous Data Center, with co-author Brian Chee, is scheduled for release in the Fall of 2018.

When he's not writing, Curtis is a painter, photographer, cook, and multi-instrumentalist musician. He is active in amateur radio (KG4GWA), scuba diving, stand-up paddleboarding, and is a certified Florida Master Naturalist.

Articles by Curtis Franklin Jr.

How to Stay Secure on GitHub

8/18/2020
GitHub, used badly, can be a source of more vulnerabilities than successful collaborations. Here are ways to keep your development team from getting burned on GitHub.

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Security 101: SQL Injection

5/27/2020
A carefully crafted attack can convince a database to reveal all its secrets. Understanding the basics of what the attack looks like and how to protect against it can go a long way toward limiting the threat.

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How to Manage API Security

12/17/2019
Protecting the places where application services meet is critical for protecting enterprise IT. Here's what security pros need to know about "the invisible glue" that keeps apps talking to each other.

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A Murderers' Row of Poisoning Attacks

10/11/2019
Poisoning can be used against network infrastructure and applications. Understanding how DNS cache poisoning, machine learning model poisoning, and other attacks work can help you prepare the proper antidote.

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Behind the Scenes at ICS Village

8/16/2019
ICS Village co-founder Bryson Bort reveals plans for research-dedicated events that team independent researchers, critical infrastructure owners, and government specialists.

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COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 9/25/2020
WannaCry Has IoT in Its Crosshairs
Ed Koehler, Distinguished Principal Security Engineer, Office of CTO, at Extreme Network,  9/25/2020
Safeguarding Schools Against RDP-Based Ransomware
James Lui, Ericom Group CTO, Americas,  9/28/2020
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From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-26120
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-27
XSS exists in the MobileFrontend extension for MediaWiki before 1.34.4 because section.line is mishandled during regex section line replacement from PageGateway. Using crafted HTML, an attacker can elicit an XSS attack via jQuery's parseHTML method, which can cause image callbacks to fire even witho...
CVE-2020-26121
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-27
An issue was discovered in the FileImporter extension for MediaWiki before 1.34.4. An attacker can import a file even when the target page is protected against "page creation" and the attacker should not be able to create it. This occurs because of a mishandled distinction between an uploa...
CVE-2020-25812
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-27
An issue was discovered in MediaWiki 1.34.x before 1.34.4. On Special:Contributions, the NS filter uses unescaped messages as keys in the option key for an HTMLForm specifier. This is vulnerable to a mild XSS if one of those messages is changed to include raw HTML.
CVE-2020-25813
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-27
In MediaWiki before 1.31.10 and 1.32.x through 1.34.x before 1.34.4, Special:UserRights exposes the existence of hidden users.
CVE-2020-25814
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-27
In MediaWiki before 1.31.10 and 1.32.x through 1.34.x before 1.34.4, XSS related to jQuery can occur. The attacker creates a message with [javascript:payload xss] and turns it into a jQuery object with mw.message().parse(). The expected result is that the jQuery object does not contain an <a> ...