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4/30/2021
10:00 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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7 Modern-Day Cybersecurity Realities

Security pros may be working with a false sense of security. We explore seven places where old methods and techniques have to change to keep their organizations safe.
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Image Source: Adobe Stock: freshidea

Image Source: Adobe Stock: freshidea

Move to the cloud. Shift left. Buy the latest XDR and deception tools. The technology and cybersecurity industry has always been susceptible to marketing hype, but do these moves actually make their organizations more secure? Or do they just add more complexity?

With all the major hacks, from SolarWinds to the issues with Microsoft Exchange, how can security pros sleep at night? They may think they are doing the right thing, but are they operating with a false sense of security?

Michael Isbitski, technology evangelist at Salt Security, says security pros have to focus more on securing the application programming interfaces (APIs) that power many of these tech strategies. From hosting internal cloud apps to relying on gateways and traditional patch management tools, the old methods don't focus enough on API security – and the APIs are susceptible to attackers.  

"With so much at stake, businesses need to humbly accept that they have been overly confident in these security approaches and tool choices," Isbitski says. "They should seek to update their tooling and processes accordingly to address modern threats."

We've compiled seven tips to help security pros sort out what they need to think about as they deploy many of these evolving security concepts and technologies.

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience and has covered networking, security, and IT as a writer and editor since 1992. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio
 

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carolynperry
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carolynperry,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/26/2021 | 12:29:11 PM
Re: Digital Identities are the most vulnerable attack vector
yes this is really good
JulieS680
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JulieS680,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/17/2021 | 4:55:29 PM
Digital Identities are the most vulnerable attack vector
Great read, thanks!

I would add that cybersecurity pros need to embrace the importance of securing digital identities in their security strategies. As we've witnessed, digital identities (user names and passwords) are the most exploited attack vector  - with a valid set of credentials, criminals can just login to get access to critical resources and systems and do significant damage.

Modern approaches to identity security - the protection of human/machine identityes through technologies like dentity proofing, MFA, risk-based authentication -  and identity defined security - using a trusted identitiy to further secure transactions throughout the entire technology stack -  are important to addressing the cybersecurity realities we face today.
jake_hyve
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jake_hyve,
User Rank: Author
5/4/2021 | 7:35:54 AM
Response to 7 Modern-Day Cybersecurity Realities article
Really interesting read. To add - I think everyone in a company should be responsible for ensuring security, not just the security or tech people
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