theDocumentId => 1339299 6 Ways Passwords Fail Basic Security Tests

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Threat Intelligence

10/28/2020
02:35 PM

6 Ways Passwords Fail Basic Security Tests

New data shows humans still struggle with password creation and management.
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Too Short
When it comes to defeating automated password-cracking techniques, longer is - all other things being equal - better. Much longer is much better. How do we know this beyond what 'common sense' might say? We know because Claude Shannon made it so it as he mathematically proved perfect secrecy in 1945 with a key the same length as the message itself.
All of this makes many security professionals gnash their teeth over the fact that 45% of users have passwords that are no longer than eight characters. Only about one-fifth (22%) have passwords that are 12 characters long, or longer. 
In 2014, security expert Jonathan Lampe published research on a huge store of passwords in which he found that the average password length was just slightly longer than the minimum required by the PCI-DSS standard (eight characters). It doesn't seem that password patterns have changed significantly since then: The minimum length will define the total length of the password for most users.
(Image: vinnstock VIA Adobe Stock)

Too Short

When it comes to defeating automated password-cracking techniques, longer is - all other things being equal - better. Much longer is much better. How do we know this beyond what "common sense" might say? We know because Claude Shannon made it so it as he mathematically proved perfect secrecy in 1945 with a key the same length as the message itself.

All of this makes many security professionals gnash their teeth over the fact that 45% of users have passwords that are no longer than eight characters. Only about one-fifth (22%) have passwords that are 12 characters long, or longer.

In 2014, security expert Jonathan Lampe published research on a huge store of passwords in which he found that the average password length was just slightly longer than the minimum required by the PCI-DSS standard (eight characters). It doesn't seem that password patterns have changed significantly since then: The minimum length will define the total length of the password for most users.

(Image: vinnstock VIA Adobe Stock)

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TravisEcc
50%
50%
TravisEcc,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/29/2020 | 6:27:45 PM
Re: Password managers can be hacked
Yes they can but the better ones do encryption on the device.
Also some level of protection is better than none.
Considering most users have 3-5 Social media accounts, at least 1 bank account, at least one email, not to mention government services, mobile logins, work logins, online shopping, insurance accounts, home computer that makes 11 at a minimum.
Statistics show most users have 1 password protecting 5+ accounts.
A password manager, implemented properly, with MFA is better than reuse or simple passwords relied on by memory.
semitad
75%
25%
semitad,
User Rank: Strategist
10/28/2020 | 4:58:59 PM
Password managers can be hacked
I understand the need to manage passwords in some way, but as with all security, the more convenient something is, the less secure it is. With the breach at LastPass not long ago, many are reluctant to put all their eggs in a basket in the cloud. Writing passwords in a notebook is scoffed at, but a paper notebook can't be hacked over the internet. I always tell people to use what works for them. Some people love online password managers, others love writing them down, and still others just have a great memory. Everyone is different and should use what works best for them. 
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